Author Not Surprised by Retired General’s Claim About Muslim Brotherhood Inside Pentagon

When I heard retired Army Lt. Gen. Jerry Boykin telling an interviewer in the video below that he knows our government — including the Pentagon! — has been infiltrated at the highest levels by members of the radical Muslim Brotherhood, I wasn’t the least bit surprised.  Why?  I’ll explain after you watch the video below.

I wasn’t surprised, because I spent four years conducting an exhaustive investigation of the credibility assessment tools relied upon by federal government agencies and members of the contractor community as they screen individuals for employment, conduct background investigations and interrogate individuals suspected of criminal, terrorist and/or treasonous activities.

Along the way, I uncovered three separate memos — one of which was issued by then-Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr., who now serves as Director of National Intelligence — via which senior Department of Defense officials informed all DoD personnel that the century-old polygraph was the only credibility assessment technology authorized for their use.

I also revealed the existence of a “turf war” that’s been raging silently for more than 40 years between polygraph loyalists unwilling to embrace a newer, more-reliable technology that’s already been embraced by more than 1,900 local and state law enforcement agencies nationwide.

General Boykin’s claims begin to make sense when one takes into consideration how well the polygraph has performed in several key areas:

• Despite what International Security Assistance Force officials once posted and later removed from the ISAF Facebook page, the portable polygraph deployed to Afghanistan certainly hasn’t improved the vetting process used to screen Afghan recruits or prevented record numbers of “Green-on-Blue” Attacks during the past five years.

• Periodic polygraph exams should have helped prevent the unauthorized disclosure of millions of classified and/or sensitive documents by people like Edward Snowden.  Instead, he was able to pass the very polygraph exams that were supposed to have caught him.

• During the early days of the so-called “Global War on Terror,” officials at Guantanamo Bay found themselves unable to count on support from polygraph loyalists when it came time to interrogate detainees.  And when they turned to a non-polygraph technology and began to realize extraordinary results, DoD officials removed the non-polygraph tool from their arsenal!

The general’s claim also makes sense when one considers that a Freedom of Information Act request, via which I seek to obtain copies of unclassified documents related to DoD contracts for purchases of polygraph equipment, is about to turn 20 months old.

TCM Graphic 2-17-13It’s worth noting that I’m not the only one who believes what I share on this topic in my second nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO.

Maj. Gen. Paul Vallely, a retired U.S. Army general who once served as deputy commander of U.S. Army Pacific, endorsed the book, wrote, “Bob McCarty has uncovered a high-tech ‘turf war’ pitting those who want the best for our troops against others who seem to be focused on their own self-interests.  Sadly, it seems the wrong people are winning this war.  I highly recommend THE CLAPPER MEMO.”

Capt. Larry W. Bailey, a retired U.S. Navy officer who once served as commander of the U.S. Navy SEALs training program, characterized what I expose in the book as “clearly an unconscionable cover-up of a capability of the U.S. military and intelligence community to vet incoming Afghan (or any other) military personnel.”

David P. Schippers, the man who served as Congressman Henry Hyde‘s chief investigative counsel during the Clinton Impeachment Hearings in the U.S. House of Representatives, described the book as “perhaps the most thorough investigative reporting I have encountered in years.  I direct the attention of the so-called major media to it.  This is how it’s done!”

Gold Star family members have praised the book, too.

MaryLiz Grossetto, the aunt of LCpl. Greg Buckley Jr., a 21-year-old Marine who died in Afghanistan in August 2012 as the result of a “Green-on-Blue” or “Insider” attack,  read the book.  Afterward, she offered this review“Read this book & you will see how our government has for many, many years deprived our military of the best possible tool for vetting & weeding out the enemy.”

Billy and Karen Vaughn shared their observations about the book almost two years after their son, U.S. Navy SEAL Aaron Carson Vaughn, lost his life along with 29 other Americans when their helicopter, call sign “Extortion 17,” was shot down in Afghanistan Aug. 6, 2011.  In their endorsement, they wrote, “THE CLAPPER MEMO by Bob McCarty gives the reader an in-depth look into the dirty little secrets of politics and greed triumphing over safety and security for our fighting men and women as well as the average American citizen.”

I hope you’ll take the opportunity to read the book, too!

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

DNI Clapper Launches Contest to Find Already-Existing Technology

Officials at the Office of the Director of National Intelligence caught me by surprise today when they issued a news release about the launch of a contest for which they plan to award $50,000 in prize money.  Why was I surprised?  Because the proven credibility assessment technology allegedly being sought by DNI James R. Clapper Jr. and his gang at the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity already exists!  The details are in my latest nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO.

ODNI News Release 2-20-14During four years of exhaustive investigation into the use of credibility assessment technologies by federal government agencies, I learned how some 2,000 local and state law enforcement agencies are currently using the technology — known as the Computer Voice Stress Analyzer® — which relies on a proprietary computer algorithm that measures microtremors in the human voice.

In addition, I interviewed military, intelligence and private security company officials about their positive experiences with CVSA® in places like Guantanamo Bay and Iraq before the technology was stripped from their control by, among other things, a memo signed by DNI Clapper.

Interestingly, I also reviewed and dissected several of the available studies — including one done by officials at the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory.

By the time I finished my research, I realized what — or, more accurately, who — is keeping CVSA® from being adopted on a widespread basis throughout the federal government.  It’s the polygraph loyalists (i.e., people unwilling to change horses midstream even after realizing the century-old horses they’re riding are dead).

Clapper Office / Book Photo

Click image above to order book.

It’s worth noting that I’m not the only one who believes my findings!

When Maj. Gen. Paul Vallely, a retired U.S. Army general who once served as deputy commander of U.S. Army Pacific, endorsed the book, he wrote, “Bob McCarty has uncovered a high-tech ‘turf war’ pitting those who want the best for our troops against others who seem to be focused on their own self-interests.  Sadly, it seems the wrong people are winning this war.  I highly recommend THE CLAPPER MEMO.”

Capt. Larry W. Bailey, a retired U.S. Navy officer who once served as commander of the U.S. Navy SEALs training program, characterized what I expose in the book as “clearly an unconscionable cover-up of a capability of the U.S. military and intelligence community to vet incoming Afghan (or any other) military personnel.”

David P. Schippers, the man who served as Congressman Henry Hyde‘s chief investigative counsel during the Clinton Impeachment Hearings in the U.S. House of Representatives, described the book as “perhaps the most thorough investigative reporting I have encountered in years.  I direct the attention of the so-called major media to it.  This is how it’s done!”

MaryLiz Grossetto, the aunt of LCpl. Greg Buckley Jr., a 21-year-old Marine who died in Afghanistan in August 2012 as the result of a “Green-on-Blue” or “Insider” attack,  read the book.  Afterward, she offered this review“Read this book & you will see how our government has for many, many years deprived our military of the best possible tool for vetting & weeding out the enemy.”

Finally, Billy and Karen Vaughn shared their observations about the book almost two years after their son, U.S. Navy SEAL Aaron Carson Vaughn, lost his life along with 29 other Americans when their helicopter, call sign “Extortion 17,” was shot down in Afghanistan Aug. 6, 2011.  In their endorsement, they wrote, “THE CLAPPER MEMO by Bob McCarty gives the reader an in-depth look into the dirty little secrets of politics and greed triumphing over safety and security for our fighting men and women as well as the average American citizen.”

Rather than trust an INSTINCT, the acronym for the contest that looks somewhat like a federal government bureaucrat’s job title when spelled out (i.e., Investigating Novel Statistical Techniques to Identify Neurophysiological Correlates of Trustworthiness), they should trust the proven track record of CVSA® and save the government some prize money.

Want to learn more about this mess?  Order a copy of THE CLAPPER MEMO today!

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Admiral Labels ‘Insider Threat’ to U.S. Warfighters in Afghanistan ‘As Dangerous As It Ever Was’

Pentagon Press Secretary Rear Adm. John Kirby was quoted in Stars and Stripes Friday as saying the “insider threat” against American forces in Afghanistan is “as dangerous as it ever was.” And he’s right.  What he did not mention, however, is the fact that many “insider attacks” are preventable.

Click image above to read more articles about "Green-on-Blue" or "Insider" attacks.

Click image above to read more articles about “Green-on-Blue” or “Insider” attacks.

Admiral Kirby’s comments likely stem from the fact that he’s been kept in the dark about decisions made by senior Department of Defense officials during the past decade that have resulted in the best screening and interrogation tools available being kept out of the hands of U.S. military and intelligence officials.  Out of the hands of interrogation officials in places like Afghanistan and Iraq.  And, most recently, out of the vetting process used to screen recruits hoping to serve in Afghanistan’s military, police and security agencies.

Click image above to order.

Click image above to order.

In my latest nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO, I share never-before-published details about decisions made by DoD officials at the highest levels — including Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr. when he was serving as Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence — and about decisions that should be made in the future.

Unfortunately for good men like Spc. John A. Pelham, 22, of Portland, Ore., and Sgt. First Class Roberto C. Skelt, 41, of York, Fla., any decisions to change policy will come too late.  The Army Special Forces Soldiers were killed Wednesday when, according to the aforementioned Stripes report, two individuals wearing Afghan National Army uniforms opened fire on them with machine guns.  They became casualties of yet another “Green-on-Blue” or “Insider Attack.”

Click image above to read endorsements of THE CLAPPER MEMO.

Click image above to read endorsements of THE CLAPPER MEMO.

Capt. Larry W. Bailey, U.S. Navy retired, came to understand the gravity of this situation after reading THE CLAPPER MEMO.  In fact, the former commander of the U.S. Navy SEALs training program described what I reveal in the book as “an unconscionable cover-up.”  Others have offered similar assessments.

See if you agree.  Order your copy today!

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Members of Congress Share Blame for Snowden Scandal

I read with interest this weekend an NBC article in which House Intelligence Committee Chairman Mike Rogers (R-Mich.) is quoted as saying that former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden “was a thief who we believe had some help.”  Though I don’t have enough information upon which to agree or disagree with that assessment, I do know members of Congress deserve a great deal of blame for Snowden’s actions.

Click image above to read article.

Click image above to read article.

If members of Congress had exercised more oversight of decision-making processes used by federal government agency officials to select credibility assessment technologies, then its unlikely Edward Snowden would have found himself in a position whereby he might be able to compromise national security.  Instead, he was able to pass the very polygraph exams that were supposed to have caught him.

“More oversight” would involve holding Defense Intelligence Agency officials accountable to members of the public who attempt to use the Freedom of Information Act to obtain copies of unclassified documents from the agency.  I, for one, have waited more than 18 months for DIA officials to comply with one of my requests.

It would also involve tightening controls on programs via which Justice and Defense Department agencies dispense millions of grant dollars to individuals, usually academics, whose research methods often produce results that are suspect at best.

Click image above to read endorsements.

Click image above to read endorsements.

Finally, it would involve listening to people such as the retired U.S. Army Green Beret I interviewed as part of my aforementioned investigation.  He used a non-polygraph technology to conduct nearly 500 interrogations — more than any other individual in the U.S. military and nearly half of the total number of exams conducted by Army Special Forces Groups between 2004 and 2009 — and told me he would be willing to testify in front of Congress about the non-polygraph technology he described as “essential” for saving lives in combat zones.

Of course, members of Congress are not alone in being responsible for national security shortfalls.  Others are spotlighted inside the pages of my latest nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO.

The product of an exhaustive four-year investigation, THE CLAPPER MEMO reveals what one retired Navy SEALs training program commander described as “an unconscionable cover-up” and what several other high-profile individuals have endorsed as well.

It’s available in paperback and ebook versions.  Order THE CLAPPER MEMO today.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

World War II Soldier Writes V-MAIL Message to Parents

Before there was e-mail, Twitter, Facebook or any of myriad ways for American Soldiers to communicate with loved ones back home, there was V-MAIL. Below is the text of a V-Mail (a.k.a., “Victory Mail”) message dated Oct. 10, 1944. Written by a 20-year-old Army private serving on the the front lines of war in Northwestern Germany during World War II, it carried thoughtful messages as it was delivered to his parents in Promise City, Iowa:

Vmail Exterior

This is what the outside of a V-MAIL message looked like in 1944.

Dear Dad + Mom,

Vmail Ltr

Below an address block, this is what the interior of a V-MAIL message looked like in 1944.

I just finished a couple letters so I think I’ll write a few lines to you. The sky is very clear tonight and it is turning awfully chilly. By morning it will be very nippy I imagine. My socks are a little damp so I am going to put on a dry pair before going to bed. Between the bumps, cold + my rifle in bed with me to keep it dry, I admit I have had more comfortable beds. We’re supposed to get two more blankets soon so it will improve the situation alot. I hope. I got three letters today. They started with the eighteenth, the first mail I got + have been going backwards. Today they dated back to the 11th of Sept. I heard you weren’t feeling so good about that time. I hope you are much better now, mom. You should take your regular vacation in Florida again this winter. Right? Well it’s time to put the cat out and wind the clock for tonight. Goodnite.

Your loving son, Ted.

Dad's Official Army photo

Dad’s Official Army photo

The American Soldier who wrote the letter above was my dad. Fortunately, he and all three of his older brothers who served during World War II came home alive!

Veterans Day remains special to me, in part, because I served and several of my siblings, in-laws and friends also wore the uniforms of this country’s Armed Forces. It is, however, my dad’s Army experiences that stand out the most. To learn more about those experiences, read the 12-part series, My Father’s War Stories from World War II, which debuted in this space May 25, 2007.

Final note: Please share this with anyone you think might appreciate it.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Army Polygraph Instructor Says He Bought THE CLAPPER MEMO

It seems my latest nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO, has captured the attention of at least one polygraph loyalist inside the U.S. Army. Early this afternoon, someone using the author name, “Keith,” visited the About Bob tab at BobMcCarty.com and left a comment which appears below unedited:

Bob,

You cleary know alot about various “lie detectors” and this voice stress option really facinates me. Could you by any chance provide me with any cites in the scientific literature for peer reviewed, replicated studies on the accuracy of voice stress? I have found tons of peer reviewed material on polygraph (both pro and con), but I was unable to locate anything peer reviewed and replicated on voice stress.

Thanks…

By using the phrase, lie detector, and trying — while spelling it wrong — to use the word, fascinates, Keith came across as just another ordinary guy feigning interest in the subject matter at hand, right? Not exactly. Something I saw on my WordPress dashboard (i.e., the place where I moderate comments left by readers) told me more about Keith than he might have intended for me to know.

Next to his author name (see graphic below) and to the right of the IP address was the website URL, reverse.ncca.mil, through which his communications with my website had passed [FYI: I blacked out Keith's email address.].

Keith Comment 1 9-19-13By simply eyeballing the URL, I recognized NCCA.mil as the website of the National Center for Credibility Assessment. Located at Fort Jackson in Columbia, S.C., NCCA is the Department of Defense’s lead agency for all things polygraph and has been — under several different names — for six decades. None of the professionals working at NCCA would use “lie detector” in place of polygraph. After all, polygraph detects deception, not lies — or so they claim.

In response to Keith’s initial comment, and while knowing about his unmentioned affiliation with NCCA, I offered the kind of reply anyone should expect from an author in my shoes:

TheClapperMemoFrontCoverLR 6-5-13Read my latest nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO. Nearly everything you ever wanted to know on the subject is in the book if, that is, you’re really searching for truth.

And our conversation continued:

KEITH: Thanks Bob, I saw the book listed on Amazon. That is what led me to your site. On contraversal subjects I try to look at the science when I can. If the scientific citations I am looking for are in there, that would be fantastic.

Thanks again…

BOB: Yes, it’s all in there, Keith. I hope you and your colleagues at the National Center for Credibility Assessment — yes, it shows up when you leave a comment — learn from it.

KEITH: No problem, Bob. BTW, I am going to buy the book and if you don’t mind, will probably donate it to the NCCA library once I am done with it…

BOB: Sounds good, Keith.

BOB: By the way, is your name Keith Gaines and do you still serve as a polygraph instructor at NCCA?

KEITH: Yes, I am still an instructor here. I have also done a bit of research, to include research into areas other then traditional polygraph testing. I have a strong interest in all areas of credibility assessment. The vehicle for getting there is not important if I can see it works.

Bob, I have looked at quite a bit of the literature on voice stress and I just can’t find anything that meets what is considered traditional replicated scientific tests for accuracy, reliability, etc for voice stress. I agree polygraph is contraversal (okay, an understatement), but at least there exists a fairly significant body of research. Look, I’m not attacking here, I’m just making an observation.

I did buy your book BTW, and I will read it, promise.

I wondered how long it would take before folks like Keith showed up on one of the virtual doorstep of one of my websites. Hopefully, he and others at NCCA will read THE CLAPPER MEMO, comprehend its content, and take steps to do what’s best for our men and women in uniform — especially those facing the threat of “Green-on-Blue” attacks in Afghanistan.

To learn more, read the BASICS, then order a copy of THE CLAPPER MEMO. It comes highly recommended.

NOTE TO KEITH: Keith, controversial is spelled c-o-n-t-r-o-v-e-r-s-i-a-l.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Flaws in Screening of Afghan Recruits Exposed in New Book

During four years spent conducting an exhaustive investigation, I collected numerous documents related to the vetting process used to screen Afghan recruits before they’re allowed to wear the uniforms of their country’s military, police and security agencies. Today, I share a few examples that appear in my latest nonfiction book based on that investigation, THE CLAPPER MEMO.

In his unclassified May 12, 2011, report, “A CRISIS OF TRUST AND CULTURAL INCOMPATIBILITY,” behavioral scientist Jeffrey Bordin Ph.D., offered a chilling and critical observation for his International Security Assistance Force bosses:

“Four years ago after the May 6, 2007, murder of two U.S. Soldiers (COL James Harrison, Jr., and MSG Wilberto Sabalu, Jr.) by an Afghan National Army (ANA) soldier, an Afghan government official urged ‘patience’ regarding ISAF’s response to this killing. After an additional 54 murders of ISAF personnel since then the time for ‘patience’ is long past. Decisive actions in countering this murder epidemic are called for.”

Read more about this report in my Aug. 12, 2012, post, Little Has Changed 15 Months After Publication of Study on ‘Green-on-Blue’ Attacks.

Spc. Ramiro Bojorquez, a combat medic with the 82nd Airborne Division’s 1st Brigade Combat Team, watches a brightly decorated “jingle truck” pass along Afghanistan’s Highway 1 in Ghazni province while he and follow paratroopers patrol the area April 20, 2012.  Keeping the road clear of roadside bombs aids the flow of goods and services, which help build the country’s economy.  (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Michael J. MacLeod)

Spc. Ramiro Bojorquez, a combat medic with the 82nd Airborne Division’s 1st Brigade Combat Team, watches a brightly decorated “jingle truck” pass along Afghanistan’s Highway 1 in Ghazni province while he and follow paratroopers patrol the area April 20, 2012. Keeping the road clear of roadside bombs aids the flow of goods and services, which help build the country’s economy. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Michael J. MacLeod)

When I obtained a copy of the Army 15-6 Investigation Report concerning an attack by a so-called Afghan “ally” that took place in Afghanistan March 19, 2011, and left several Americans dead, I found the investigating officer reached several troubling conclusions. Among them, two stood out:

TheClapperMemoFrontCoverLR 6-5-13“…the policies defining the duties and responsibilities for vetting Armed Contracted Private Security Companies operating on International Security Assistance Force installations are vague and confusing.”

“…a larger comprehensive investigation be initiated to examine the vetting and screening procedures across Afghanistan.”

For more details about the 15-6 investigation, read the excerpt from THE CLAPPER MEMO that appears in my March 14 post, Army’s Reluctance to Release Investigation Report Explained.

While the above items are noteworthy, they represent but a tiny fraction of the findings I share in THE CLAPPER MEMO. For more details, including never-before-published documents from insiders at Guantanamo Bay and exclusive interviews with Special Operations professionals, order a copy of THE CLAPPER MEMO. It’s available in paperback and ebook versions at Amazon.com and comes highly recommended.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct '11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May '13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct ’11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May ’13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Dots Connect Bradley Manning, Benghazi, Afghanistan and Nation’s Top Intelligence Official

When retired U.S. Navy SEAL Capt. Larry W. Bailey concluded that the information I uncovered in my latest nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO, constitutes “an unconscionable cover-up,” he wasn’t simply throwing support behind a book because it was critical of Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr.  Instead, the co-founder of Special Operations Speaks understood bigger things were at stake.  Three examples of those “bigger things” surfaced in the news this week.

SIGAR Report 7-30-13On Tuesday, I shared seemingly-contradictory news.  While Pfc. Bradley Manning was acquitted of charges that he aided the enemy when he released hundreds of thousands of classified documents to Wikileaks, U.S. Army officials were shown to be guilty of that crime!

In his July 30 report to Congress, Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction John Sopko said Army officials in Afghanistan had refused to stop doing business with 43 individuals and companies supporting the insurgency (i.e., the Taliban, the Haqqani network, and al-Qaeda) in Afghanistan.  Why?  Officials at the Army Suspension and Debarment Office appear to believe suspension or debarment of these individuals and companies would be a violation of their due-process rights!

On Wednesday, I shared more disturbing news that I found buried more than a thousand words deep inside the latest DoD progress report from Afghanistan:

Report Progress Stability Afghan 7-13There was a 120 percent increase in insider attacks from 2011 to 2012, rising from 22 to 48 incidents. Additionally, 29 percent (14) of the insider attacks in 2012 were executed by more than one person. Prior to 2012, only two attacks had been executed by more than one individual.

Found on page 34 of the 192-page report, the words above stand in stark contrast to 39 other words (below) that appear near the top of page 3 of the report‘s Executive Summary:

The number of insider attacks declined sharply during the reporting period. Thus far, these attacks have not significantly affected the strong relationship between coalition and ANSF personnel, particularly in the field, where they face a common enemy every day.

On Thursday, I shared equally-disturbing news linked to Jake Tapper’s CNN report that CIA officials are using polygraph exams — in some cases as often as monthly — in an attempt to find out if any agency operatives have shared knowledge about the deadly events that took place Sept. 11, 2012, at the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya.

Because I spent much of the past four years conducting an exhaustive investigation of the federal government’s use of polygraph and non-polygraph tools (a.k.a., “credibility assessment technologies”), I felt somewhat qualified to ask a question about the CIA’s alleged use of frequent polygraph exams:  “If true, is it a good idea?”

Though I gave a negative response to that question, I didn’t stop there.  Instead, I asked a long-time counterintelligence professional whose name I am not at liberty to reveal for security reasons, for his thoughts on the matter, and he provided the feedback below:

“It makes no sense. People who are subjected to monthly polygraphs would quickly become desensitized to the polygraph process, and this could result in even worse accuracy rates than the typical 60-65% accuracy rate for polygraph (inconclusive & error rates range average 35-40%). This is definitely a control and intimidation measure. I guess it’s James Clapper’s new polygraph policy put into effect in the most absurd manner possible.”

Did the news surfacing this week surprise me?  Hardly.  I ran into similarly-dangerous thinking while digging for details and conducting interviews for THE CLAPPER MEMO.

TheClapperMemoFrontCoverLR 6-5-13U.S. Navy SEALs and Army Green Berets decried DoD’s decision to remove from their tool kits an investigative tool they described as being the best available.

Defense Intelligence Agency interrogators in Baghdad and at Guantanamo Bay did the same and later expressed to anyone who would listen — including yours truly — their disgust with DoD’s decision to remove that tool from their investigative arsenal.

Try as they might, DoD and Department of Justice officials have so far been unable to prevent more than 1,800 law enforcement agencies across the United States from using the investigative tool now banned by DoD.

What is this tool?  How does it work?  Why did top government officials ban its use within DoD?  Answers to all of those questions and DNI Clapper’s connection to it can be found in my latest nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO.  It’s available in paperback and ebook versions, and comes highly recommended.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

News of Spike in ‘Insider’ Attacks Buried in Latest DoD Progress Report From Afghanistan

Buried beneath more than 1,000 words inside the Department of Defense Report on Progress Toward Security and Stability in Afghanistan released Tuesday is startling and mostly-unreported news about a sharp spike in “Insider (a.k.a., ‘Green-on-Blue’)” attacks in Afghanistan:

Report Progress Stability Afghan 7-13There was a 120 percent increase in insider attacks from 2011 to 2012, rising from 22 to 48 incidents. Additionally, 29 percent (14) of the insider attacks in 2012 were executed by more than one person. Prior to 2012, only two attacks had been executed by more than one individual.

Found on page 34 of the 192-page report, the words above stand in stark contrast to 39 other words (below) that appear near the top of page 3 of the report‘s Executive Summary:

The number of insider attacks declined sharply during the reporting period. Thus far, these attacks have not significantly affected the strong relationship between coalition and ANSF personnel, particularly in the field, where they face a common enemy every day.

With the release of this report, DoD public affairs officials seem to be in a race with their Army counterparts to see which PAO group can put out the most preposterous news.

SIGAR Report 7-30-13Yesterday, Army officials released damning news I shared beneath the headline, Inspector General Says Army Doing Business With Enemy.

In short, the piece revealed how Army officials refuse to stop doing business with supporters of insurgents (i.e., the Taliban, Haqqani Network and al-Qaeda) in Afghanistan after twice being advised to do so by the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction.

Am I surprised at the findings highlighted above? Hardly.

In my latest nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO, I expose similarly-bad conduct and reveal details about how it’s festered at the highest levels of government for more than 40 years. In short, I connect the dots between three memos — including one issued by James R. Clapper Jr. — and hundreds of U.S. and Coalition Forces casualties resulting from attacks by Afghans wearing the uniforms of their nation’s military, police and security agencies. And that’s only the beginning!

Already endorsed by several prominent Americans, THE CLAPPER MEMO is available in paperback and ebook versions.

ORDER A COPY TODAY!

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Army’s Reluctance to Release Investigation Report Explained

Nine months ago, I used a headline to ask the question, Who Am I To Complain About Waiting 90 Days on Freedom of Information Act Request?  What followed the headline was a piece in which I offered a glimpse of what it’s like to obtain unclassified information from Department of Defense agencies not eager to give it up.  Today, I share even more details in the form of an excerpt from my soon-to-be-published second nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO.  Slightly modified for publication, it offers a detailed look at a document which took Dante and Carolyn Acosta more than nine months to obtain.  The text of the excerpt appears below in blue.

Jingle Truck

Spc. Ramiro Bojorquez, a combat medic with the 82nd Airborne Division’s 1st Brigade Combat Team, watches a brightly decorated “jingle truck” pass along Afghanistan’s Highway 1 in Ghazni province while he and follow paratroopers patrol the area April 20, 2012. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Michael J. MacLeod).

Even those who pay scant attention to the daily news have likely heard about the “Green-on-Blue” attacks taking place in Afghanistan.

Insidious by nature, each attack involves at least one Afghan who, while serving in an official capacity as a uniform-wearing member of an Afghan government organization (i.e., military, police or security), turns against the very foreigners alongside whom he works and/or trains.

Often, the attacks involve the use of small arms fire.  On occasion, however, they take the form of suicide attacks or involve the use of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) and/or other deadly measures.

Though the people behind the attacks target Americans more often than any other nationalities, they remain willing to kill others — even Afghans — with whom they disagree.  “Equal opportunity killers” seems an apt description.

When it comes to the colorful label initially applied to the attacks, “Green” refers to supposedly-friendly members of the Afghan National Security Force (ANSF) and Afghan Security Group (ASG), and “Blue” the color associated with members of the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) members (a.k.a., “the good guys”).

For some six years now, reports about Green-on-Blue attacks in Afghanistan have surfaced in the news on a regular basis — sometimes daily — in the United States.  One of those attacks took place March 19, 2011.

At approximately 8 a.m., members of 4th Squadron, 2nd Stryker Cavalry Regiment (4/2 SCR TAC) were cleaning their weapons while gathered around their Stryker armored fighting vehicles outside the Tactical Operations Center (TOC) at Forward Operating Base (FOB) Frontenac, located about 20 minutes north of Kandahar by helicopter.

It wasn’t their usual place for cleaning weapons, but the Soldiers had been told they had additional time to prepare for a mission that would take them outside the confines of the ISAF outpost in the Arghandab River valley north of Kandahar.  So they cleaned.  Out in the open.  Ramps down.  Inside the entry-controlled environment of the FOB.

At about the same time, a convoy of large and colorful “jingle trucks” arrived at the FOB.

Commonly used by contractors in Afghanistan and Pakistan and known for the jingle sound made by chains hanging from their bumpers, the customized vehicles were received at the entry control point and escorted to a container area next to the TOC.

Those doing the escorting that day were employees of Tundra Security Group, a private security company based in Canada, who had been hired to provide both base defense security and a Quick Reaction Force at the FOB.

Soon after the jingle trucks arrived, 4/2 members found themselves under attack.
At 19 minutes after the hour, according to the 14-page Army Regulation 15-6 Investigation Report produced April 14, 2011, an armed Afghan employee of Tundra moved toward the Soldiers, drew his weapon and began shooting at the American Soldiers.

Facing what was described as “well-aimed automatic fire,” the majority of Soldiers immediately dropped to the ground and began seeking cover toward the front ends of their vehicles.  With their weapons disassembled for cleaning, most had no immediate means to defend themselves.

Two soldiers — a specialist and a captain — took actions that would be highlighted in the report.

Upon realizing he and his fellow Soldiers were under attack, the specialist — who had his weapon assembled, but not loaded — immediately moved between the Strykers and some nearby T-Walls (a.k.a., “Bremer walls”).  Once behind a section of the 12-foot-high, portable, steel-reinforced walls, he began loading his weapon.

At the same time, the Afghan continued firing, expending all of his rounds as he moved deliberately around the vehicles toward where the remaining Soldiers had sought cover.  Then he reloaded and continued his approach toward those Soldiers.

Before the Afghan could fire another shot, however, he came into the field of view of the specialist who, with gun now assembled and loaded, fired a well-aimed shot.

Though the Afghan assailant’s body armor kept that shot from doing damage, it didn’t stop the shots that followed — into his hip, shoulder and head — and dropped the man to the ground.

And it didn’t stop the final shot, fired by the captain when he saw the Afghan still moving, still posing a threat.

Despite the heroic actions of the American Soldiers described above, two of the unit’s men — Corporal Donald Mickler, 29, a native of Dayton, Ohio, and Private First Class Rudy Acosta, 19, of Santa Clarita Valley, California — died from injuries they suffered during the attack.  Four others were injured.

Also killed that day was the Afghan assailant, a Tundra employee, Shia Ahmed.

Ahmed’s coworkers later described him as having been a reserved, quiet individual who had revealed no clear indications prior to the attack that he was about to do anything, according to the report.

During the weeks following the attack, the investigating officer — an Army major whose name, like the other Soldiers who survived the attack, was redacted from the copy of the investigation report I obtained — learned Ahmed had a history of animosity toward American Soldiers.  A history that included using aliases.

“Most significant,” the major wrote on page one of his report, “Shia Ahmed had expressed intentions to target US Soldiers.”

Deeper into his report, the investigating officer pointed out several flaws in the process via which Afghans like Ahmed were vetted (i.e., screened) prior to working alongside American and other coalition forces (CF) personnel.

In addition, he described some of the policies defining duties and responsibilities for vetting as “vague and confusing.”

In the final section of his report, the investigating officer used a half-dozen paragraphs to recommend “a larger comprehensive investigation be initiated to examine the vetting and screening procedures across Afghanistan.”

TCM Graphic 2-17-13To learn more about the flawed vetting process and up-to-date details about the flawed decision-making behind it, be sure to order a copy of THE CLAPPER MEMO, when it goes on sale this spring now on sale.

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Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.