About Bob McCarty

A native of Enid, Oklahoma, Bob McCarty graduated from Oklahoma State University with a degree in journalism in 1984. During the next two decades, he served stints as an Air Force public affairs officer, a political campaign manager, a technology sales consultant and a public relations professional. Since 2006, he has dedicated himself to full-time writing and, in October 2011, published his first nonfiction book, Three Days In August: A U.S. Army Special Forces Soldier’s Fight For Military Justice. His second book, THE CLAPPER MEMO, was published in May 2013. Bob is married, has three sons and lives in the St. Louis area. NOTE: Bob is available for media and blogger interviews. Simply send a message containing all of the particulars of your request to him. He’ll try to respond as soon as possible.

McCaskill Three Times Slower Than GOP Counterparts to Assist

I stand amazed at how much the responses I’ve received from Sen. Roy Blunt, Sen. Claire McCaskill and U.S. Rep. Ann Wagner have varied since Jan. 13 when I contacted the offices of these people who purport to represent me and my fellow citizens in the Show-Me State in the U.S. Congress and asked for help in dealing with officials at the Defense Intelligence Agency.

Ann Wagner FB Screen shot 2014-01-13 at 8.22.07 AM

Click image above to read article.

Congresswoman Wagner’s staff has been most responsive. In fact, I received a phone call the same day I sent her both an email message and a message via Facebook. Since then, I’ve exchanged multiple email messages with members of her staff.

Sadly, the congresswoman’s staffers have, so far, been able to generate only a cursory reply letter (dated Feb. 28 and received March 3) from James L. Kaplan, DIA’s Chief of Congressional Relations.

Senator Blunt’s staffers, on the other hand, have been less responsive than Congresswoman Wagner’s, but not the worst among the Missouri delegation. My correspondence with them began when I used the senator’s online communication tool to submit the following message:

Eighteen months ago, I filed a Freedom of Information Act request with the Defense Intelligence Agency. In it, I requested copies of unclassified documents related to polygraph contracts. To date, I have been thoroughly stonewalled. Now, I need Senator Blunt’s help to find out why.

Beyond that, I included a link to an article in which I had outlined my experience to date with the DIA. Senator Blunt’s staffers responded — via snail mail letter dated Feb. 12, not the much-quicker email — by sending me a Privacy Act Release Statement which I had to complete and return by snail mail.

Blunt-Blunt-McCaskill-LtrsIn an auto-signed letter dated March 11 and received a few days later, Senator Blunt informed me that he made contact with DIA officials and that they had responded to his inquiry. Attached to it was a letter from Kaplan that was virtually identical to the one Congresswoman Wagner had received from Kaplan 11 days earlier.

Click image above to read article.

Click image above to read article.

Dragging up the rear in this race to serve their constituent are members of Senator McCaskill’s staff. Despite the fact I had reached out to “Claire Bear” on the same day and in the exact same manner as I had Senator Blunt, it took her staff 92 days — or 34 days longer — to reply with a letter (dated April 9) almost identical to the initial reply received from her Republican counterpart.

So, what is all of the fuss about? As of today, I’ve waited exactly 21 months for DIA officials to comply with requirements of the Freedom of Information Act and fulfill my request for copies of unclassified documents related to Department of Defense purchases of polygraph equipment since Jan. 1, 2000.

And why have DIA officials worked so hard to keep this information out of my hands? Read my book, THE CLAPPER MEMO, and you’ll begin to understand their reluctance.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

DIA Continues to Stonewall Freedom of Information Act Request — 21 Months (So Far)

Unless something unexpected happens during the next 48 hours, a Freedom of Information Act request I submitted to the Defense Intelligence Agency will turn 21 months old Wednesday, and a citizen’s access to unclassified details about government purchases of polygraph machines will continue to be squelched.

DIA Seal I don’t expect a response sooner than Friday since DIA officials will be in Tampa until Thursday, attending GEOINT, the nation’s largest intelligence gathering that was originally set to take place six months ago but was postponed due to the government shutdown.  Truth be told, I don’t anticipate a response at all after almost two years of waiting.  DIA officials don’t want to make their top boss, Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr., look any worse than he already does after lying to Congress and allowing things like the Edward Snowden scandal to occur on his watch.  But I can dream, can’t I?

What unclassified information do I want so badly that DIA officials do not want me to have?  It’s described below as it appeared in my FOIA request July 16, 2012:

“…copies of any and all initial and follow-up contracts (i.e., solicitations, contracts, statements of work and task orders) related to the Portable Credibility Assessment Screening System (PCASS) or Preliminary Credibility Assessment Screening System (PCASS) that have been awarded by any Department of Defense agency to Lafayette Instrument Company of Lafayette, Indiana, and any other contractors, academic institutions, laboratories and subcontractors from January 1, 2000, to present.”

Don’t get me wrong.  DIA officials did respond to my initial request.  In a piece May 24, 2013, I described how their response fell far short of expectations by providing only 12 pages of documentation dating back only as far as June 25, 2010 — not Jan. 1, 2000, as requested — and how, coincidentally or not, the agency’s response arrived one week after the release of my second nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO, for which I was seeking the information. In addition, I highlighted a portion (below) of the appeal letter I mailed the same day:

PolygraphIn responding to my request, you included only 12 pages of documentation dating back as far as June 25, 2010. That, by any stretch of the imagination, is UNSATISFACTORY; therefore, I must contest the $155.80 assessment for “professional search and review time of 3.5 hours at $44.00 per hour, reproduction and release costs of 12 pages at 15¢ per page.” Until such time as a genuine effort is made on behalf of your agency to provide the requested documentation, I shall not remit payment as requested.

In a letter dated Feb. 28 and received March 3, DIA Chief of Congressional Relations James L. Kaplan even had the nerve to stonewall my Congressional representative, U.S. Rep. Ann Wagner.

While I could wax poetic about my frustration related to this stonewalling, I won’t.  Instead, I’ll point you to my second nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO, and recommend you read it if you truly want to understand why I’m so interested in the documents being withheld from me and why so many high-profile people have endorsed my book.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

TCM Author Pens Fiction Novel

Three weeks ago, I began editing the 400-plus pages of the final draft of my still-untitled first fiction novel (a.k.a., “book #3). Today, I finished the process!

1560473_10202464425665591_755938409_nNow, it’s time to send the manuscript off for review by people with “fresh sets of eyes.”

I think you’ll like it when it’s released this summer, especially if you liked either of my first two books, Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO, both of which are nonfiction works and can be ordered in paperback and email formats at Amazon.com.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Author Wants Honest Answers From Speakers at Nation’s Largest Intelligence Gathering

Originally scheduled to take place six months ago but postponed due to the government shutdown, GEOINT 2013* Symposium is now set for April 14-17 in Tampa, Fla. Touted as the largest intelligence event in the U.S., according to a news release issued by the United States Geospatial Intelligence Foundation, this event stands as a target-rich environment for someone like me who simply wants some honest answers from a handful of the event’s keynote speakers.

GEOINT 2013#

Atop the list of speakers from whom I’d like answers is Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr., the man whose name appears in the title of my second and most-recent nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO. I’d like to ask DNI Clapper why, as Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence seven years ago, he issued a memo declaring the polygraph the only authorized credibility assessment tool for use by Department of Defense personnel when a newer, more reliable and more effective credibility assessment technology was — and still is — available to U.S. military and intelligence personnel.

Second on my list is Defense Intelligence Agency Director Lt. Gen. Michael T. Flynn. I’d like to ask the Army three-star general why I’ve had to wait 632 days (so far) for DIA officials to fulfill my Freedom of Information Act request for unclassified information related to DoD purchases of portable polygraph equipment during the past 12 years. Specifically, I asked for the following information in my request July 16, 2012:

“…copies of any and all initial and follow-up contracts (i.e., solicitations, contracts, statements of work and task orders) related to the Portable Credibility Assessment Screening System (PCASS) or Preliminary Credibility Assessment Screening System (PCASS) that have been awarded by any Department of Defense Agency to Lafayette Instrument Company of Lafayette, Indiana, and any other contractors, academic institutions, laboratories and subcontractors from January 1, 2000, to present.”

Unfortunately, DIA’s only fulfillment to date, a mail parcel that I received May 9, 2013, fell far short of expectations. It contained only 12 pages of documentation dating back only as far as June 25, 2010 — not to Jan. 1, 2000, as requested. Coincidentally, the date that appeared atop the letter, May 2, 2013, was the exact day THE CLAPPER MEMO, the book for which I was seeking the information, was released. Coincidence? I think not.

Of course, there are others on the list of keynoters with whom I’d like to speak.

I’d like to ask three flag officers — Gen. Lloyd J. Austin III, commander of U.S. Central Command, Adm. William H. McRaven, commander of U.S. Special Operations Command, and Lt. Gen. Raymond P. Palumbo, Director for Defense Intelligence for Warfighter Support in the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence how they can look in the mirror each day while knowing a tool proven more effective and reliable than the century-old polygraph is being kept out of the hands of their front-line warriors.

U.S. Rep. C.A. "Dutch" Ruppersberger (D-Md)

U.S. Rep. C.A. “Dutch” Ruppersberger (D-Md)

Finally, I’d like to ask Maryland Congressman C.A. “Dutch” Ruppersberger why he, as Ranking Member of the U.S. House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, hasn’t shown more interest in this topic. He was, after all, among the several dozen members of Congress who received copies of my book in which I point fingers and name names.

Based on the findings of my exhaustive four-year investigation into the federal government’s use of so-called credibility assessment technologies, including the polygraph, THE CLAPPER MEMO has received rave reviews from people who know what it’s like to have a “dog in the fight.”

To learn more about the book, visit http://TheClapperMemo.com. To order a copy, click here or on the graphic below.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Newspaper Reporter Explains How He ‘Beat’ Polygraph Exam

Over the weekend, I came across an article that speaks volumes about the implications of the federal government’s continued reliance on century-old polygraph technology instead of a challenger proven more effective during more than four decades of use.  In two short paragraphs, it reveals how news reporter John Funk “beat” a polygraph machine without training in the use of countermeasures:

PolygraphFrom the moment the test began, I started visualizing the number four — not six — written on the the paper under my leg.

When he got to four, I flexed my biceps and intentionally made my breathing shallow. At six, I made a conscious effort to relax as much as possible.

It’s a good thing he didn’t go into more detail about how he defeated the machine; that could have gotten him arrestedBut I digress.

If reporter John Funk was able to beat the polygraph with ZERO training, is it so surprising that Edward Snowden was able to pass two polygraphs and gain access to America’s most precious secrets?  Hardly!

And how many more Snowdens are lurking among the millions of people who hold U.S. Government security clearances?  Plenty!

Click image above to read article.

Click image above to read article.

Less than a week ago, Department of Defense leaders vowed to overhaul the personnel screening process.  Sadly, they made no mention of moving away from the polygraph to the non-polygraph technology that’s been proven more effective.

If you want to read up-close accounts of how the non-polygraph technology has been used in places like Guantanamo Bay and Baghdad and by law enforcement professionals at more than 1,800 state and local agencies across the United States, read my second nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO.

Based on the findings of my exhaustive four-year investigation into the federal government’s use of so-called credibility assessment technologies, including the polygraph, THE CLAPPER MEMO has received rave reviews from people who know what it’s like to have a “dog in the fight.”  a

To learn more about it, visit http://TheClapperMemo.com.  To order a copy of the book, click here or on the graphic below.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Top Intel Lawyer Made Me Laugh

I laughed today after reading a Secrecy News post in which appeared the following words, said to have been spoken five days ago by Robert Litt, general counsel in the Office of the Director of National Intelligence:

Robert Litt, ODNI General Counsel

Robert Litt, ODNI General Counsel

“There is no question that overclassification of information is a genuine problem.”

I found Litt’s words especially humorous in light of the fact that (1) he uttered them at a Freedom of Information Day program at American University Washington College of Law and (2) I’ve waited 616 days, so far, for officials at the Defense Intelligence Agency to fulfill my Freedom of Information Act request for copies of unclassified contract documents related to Pentagon polygraph equipment purchases dating back to Jan. 1, 2000, and continuing through July 16, 2012, the day I filed the FOIA request.

I understand Litt doesn’t work for DIA, but the three-letter intelligence agency is one of 17 such agencies that full under the purview of Litt’s boss, Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr.; therefore, I have to believe Litt and Clapper might wield some influence over DIA officials who have turned FOIA stonewalling into something of an art form.

DNI James R. Clapper Jr.

DNI James R. Clapper Jr.

In related news, officials at George Washington University’s National Security Archive named DNI Clapper the 2013 recipient of the Rosemary Award.  Named for President Richard M. Nixon’s secretary, Rose Mary Woods, whose spectacular stretch allegedly erased 18 1/2 minutes of a Watergate tape, the (dis)honor recognizes the worst open-government performance by a government officials.

If you’re curious as to why DIA officials might not want to fulfill my FOIA request, you’ll be able to hazard a pretty good guess after reading my second nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO.

To learn more about it, visit http://TheClapperMemo.com.  To order a copy of the book, click here or on the graphic below.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Federal Agencies Not Very Transparent When It Comes to Freedom of Information Act

If you think my Freedom of Information Act experience — you know, the one during which I’ve waited 612 days (so far) for Defense Intelligence Agency officials to fulfill my request for unclassified information — is unique, think again.  In reality, federal government agencies are not very transparent when it comes to fulfilling FOIA requests.

Click image above to read more about Bob's DIA FOIA request.

Click image above to read more about Bob’s DIA FOIA request.

While visiting the website of former CBS News reporter Sharyl Atkisson Wednesday evening, I came across a link to a Jan. 9 article on the NBCWashington.com. There, I read about how a Navy FOIA officer had mistakenly sent to a reporter a memo in which he detailed a strategy via which the reporter’s FOIA requests for documents related to the DC Navy Yard Shootings could be rejected or, at a minimum, stymied.

After reading the article and the memo, I can’t help but wonder if similar communications were exchanged between DIA officials seeking to reject or stymie my FOIA request for copies of contract documents related to the federal government’s purchases of polygraph equipment since Jan. 1, 2000.

To learn more about the subject matter for which I was seeking information via FOIA, order a copy of my latest nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO.  It comes highly recommended.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

DoD Vows to Overhaul Process Used to Screen Personnel

One need only read a single paragraph from a Washington Post article published Tuesday evening to understand what I reveal in my latest nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO:

Click image above to order.

Click image above to order.

The Department of Defense is likely to reduce the number of employees who hold security clearances by at least 10 percent and has vowed to overhaul the way it screens personnel, officials said Tuesday, as they released the results of several probes into the Sept. 16 mass shooting at the Navy Yard.

In other words, the vetting process used by federal government agencies to screen individuals under consideration for employment and/or security clearances is flawed, and the business-as-usual approach to national security no longer works.  Now, the powers that be in Washington, D.C., claim they’re going to do something to fix it.  Not holding my breath.

I’ve been shouting this from the mountain top for almost four years, and finally put the facts into a simple format anyone — even folks in the nation’s capitol — can read and understand: THE CLAPPER MEMO.

Learn more about what one former Navy SEALs training program commander calls “an unconscionable cover-up.” Order a copy of THE CLAPPER MEMO.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Law Enforcement Officials Tout Technology Few Know Exists

You haven’t seen it in a movie or on television yet, but law enforcement agencies in Atlanta, New Orleans, Nashville, Baltimore and Miami have been using something other than the polygraph — some of them for years.  Even the California Highway Patrol relies upon it.  What is it?  It’s the technology polygraph loyalists love to hate that’s at the center of the decades-old “turf war” described in my latest nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO.

Click on image above to order the book, THE CLAPPER MEMO, shown superimposed on a photo of an M4 carbine at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan.  Photo credit:  U.S. Army photo by Spc. Ken Scar.

Click on image above to order the book, THE CLAPPER MEMO, shown superimposed on a photo of an M4 carbine at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan. Photo credit: U.S. Army photo by Spc. Ken Scar.

In a news release issued today, officials with the National Association of Computer Voice Stress Analysts list it as an accurate and efficient crime-fighting technology that, like DNA analysis, helps clear the innocent and find the guilty:

Law Enforcement Embracing Improved Accuracy and Efficiency of New Crime Fighting Technologies

LEWES, Del., March 18, 2014 /PRNewswire/ — Innocent people are being exonerated in record numbers as new technologies such as DNA become more sophisticated and the Computer Voice Stress Analyzer (CVSA) is increasingly being used for truth verification instead of the old polygraph.  This is according to Clifford Payne, an Investigator with the Atlanta (GA) Police Department who also serves as a Regional Director of the National Association of Computer Voice Stress Analysts, an organization representing the nearly 2,000 US law enforcement agencies that utilize the CVSA.

“As law enforcement professionals, our main goal is to make sure only the guilty are prosecuted,” stated Payne.  “With the refinement of DNA testing we are now better able to accurately determine where the criminal justice system failed in the past as innocent men and women, some whose lives are ruined forever, are being released from prison on a regular basis.  This is in no small part due to organizations such as the Innocence Project, improved DNA testing, and the help of technologies such as the CVSA.”

Miami-Dade (FL) Police Det. Lisa Morales is among the thousands of detectives that have experienced this first hand.  Det./CVSA Analyst Lisa Morales reported that a female subject was accused of repeatedly stabbing her ex-boyfriend and children’s father. There was an adult male witness that implicated the female and uniformed officers were poised to arrest her based on both men’s statements even though the female insisted that she was being “framed” by the two men. The investigating detective just had one of those feelings and asked if Det. Morales would run a CVSA exam on the female. She passed and the “witness” ultimately confessed that he stabbed his uncle and they conspired to have the female falsely arrested so that the father could get custody of the children because the female refused to reconcile with him.  According to the NACVSA, this is just another example of the CVSA exam being used to clear someone rather than implicate them.  (Read more Real Cases at CVSA1.com/realcases.htm)

Payne stated that before the CVSA, law enforcement had to rely on the old polygraph.  “Our main problem was that 30% of polygraph examinations are ‘inconclusive’, meaning that there were no discernible results.  With the CVSA, there are always correct results 100% of the time.  When you also take in to account that it takes eight weeks to train a polygraph examiner and only five days to train a CVSA examiner, plus the fact that polygraph exams take between 2-3 hours and the CVSA exam can be performed in 1 hour with perfect results, it is clear which system to use.”  The Atlanta Police Department discontinued the polygraph in 2003 in favor of the CVSA.

Major US law enforcement agencies such as those in Atlanta, New Orleans, Nashville, Baltimore, and Miami, as well as the California Highway Patrol, depend upon the CVSA to investigate criminal cases as well as for screening police applicants.  “As an investigative and decision support tool the CVSA has proven itself to be invaluable to law enforcement,” stated Lt. Kenneth Merchant, of the Erie, PA Police Department, who serves as the Legislative Affairs Director for the NACVSA.

To learn more about CVSA® and THE CLAPPER MEMO, listen to the audio of my recent two-hour guest appearance on Coast to Coast AM with George Noory.

To understand the entire story of this turf war between polygraph and CVSA®, order a copy of THE CLAPPER MEMO.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty’s Appearance on ‘Coast to Coast AM’ (Audio)

Two days after I went on the air as a guest of George Noory on his show, Coast to Coast AM, a loyal fan sent me a link to a YouTube video featuring the audio of my appearance.  It begins after the 12-minute mark.

UPDATE:  For some reason, the video of the broadcast went “PRIVATE.”  As soon as I can locate another source for the interview audio, I’ll share it here.  You can, however, download the podcast (subscription required) of the show.

An estimated three million listeners tuned in to hear the discussion about my latest nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO, via 506 radio stations across the United States and in Canada, Mexico and Guam.  Now, I hope those listeners will take the next step (i.e., buy the book) and then demand elected officials in Washington, D.C., take action to correct the wrongs I’ve uncovered.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.