Portable Polygraph Technology Remains Shrouded in Mystery

Mystery continues to surround the Defense Intelligence Agency’s refusal to provide copies of unclassified contract documents related to the purchase of portable polygraph devices. To date, the agency’s refusal to provide the documents, requested via the Freedom of Information Act, has lasted almost 17 months.

The video above offers cursory details — and a little criticism — about the portable polygraph devices officially known as the Preliminary Credibility Assessment Screening System (PCASS). It accompanied an article published on the MSNBC website April 9, 2008, about the announced deployment of the devices to war zones in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Together, the article and the video combined to capture my attention and, in tandem with events that followed one year later, led to publication of my second nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO, in May 2013.

On April 8, 2009, I launched an exhaustive four-year investigation into the federal government’s use of credibility assessment technologies — including one technology (i.e., the polygraph) that deserved to die 10 years ago but continues to be relied upon by the Department of Defense and other federal agencies.

Available in paperback and ebook versions, THE CLAPPER MEMO has been ENDORSED by several high-profile Americans who understand the implications of my findings. I hope you’ll order a copy for yourself or a friend.

CORRECTION:  An incorrect date was included in this piece, but has been corrected.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

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